Media Release

Penetron Restores a Damaged Drinking Water Supply System in the Ural Mountains

Russia

The official June 2020 inspection of the Iremel Reservoir waterworks in Chelyabinsk Oblast, Russia verified the viability of concrete structures repaired earlier this year. Crystalline waterproofing specialists Tori, the Penetron distributor for the Chelyabinsk region, restored the damaged concrete structures lying under the Iremel Reservoir.

Due to increased residential and commercial construction, the drinking water supply for the region around the city of Miass needed to be augmented. The decision was made to tap the nearby natural water reservoir in the Iremel region as an additional source of drinking water.

The Iremel Reservoir project comprised the construction of a water pipeline (two polyethylene and steel pipelines – 538 m long) with protective concrete corridors that run from the water intake site at the reservoir down to the pumping stations. Also included in the project was a transformer substation at the Iremel hydroelectric complex.
 

Stopping Water Seepage

Shortly after construction was completed, construction joints in the lower corridor, which runs under the water reservoir for about 200 meters (660 feet), started leaking. Eugene Veinberg, Director of the Tori Company, the Penetron distributor for Chelyabinsk Oblast, was called in to provide a watertight solution. "Last year, we were asked to stop the leaks in the concrete and the construction joints of the lower corridor at the Iremel hydroelectric dam complex. We successfully applied a combination of the Penetron System to stop the leaks, resulting in a waterproof concrete structure.”

Last month, a facility inspection was carried out at the Iremel hydroelectric complex by the Miass Water Provision Department, the local municipal drinking water authorities. The inspection report stated, “water seepage through the concrete matrix and the construction joints is no longer visible. The concrete surfaces of the corridor are completely dry."

PENEPLUG was initially applied to quickly seal all active leaks. The Penetron repair team then routed out the leaking construction joints and cut back any exposed rebar stubs and damaged concrete to fill in the routed-out construction joints with PENECRETE MORTAR. In a final step, the repaired concrete surfaces were coated with an application of PENETRON, a topical crystalline material.
 

Life-Long Waterproofing

Once applied to a prepared concrete surface, the proprietary chemicals in Penetron crystalline products react in a catalytic reaction with moisture to generate a non-soluble crystalline formation throughout the pores and capillary tracts of the concrete. This formation permanently seals micro-cracks, pores and capillaries against the penetration of water or liquids from any direction by making the concrete impermeable. The non-soluble crystalline formation generated by PENETRON becomes an integral part of the concrete matrix, a process that takes place for the service life of the concrete.

“The positive inspection of the Iremel hydroelectric facility showed the absolute reliability of the Penetron System products used in the repairs,” adds Eugene Veinberg. “It’s noteworthy that the repairs to the facility could have been avoided if the Penetron System had been specified at the beginning of the construction project.”

The Penetron System stopped the leaks in the concrete and construction joints of the lower corridor at the Iremel hydroelectric dam complex in Russia.

A watertight solution: The Penetron System stopped the leaks in the concrete and construction joints of the lower corridor at the Iremel hydroelectric dam complex in Russia.

The Iremel Reservoir project included a water pipeline (538 m) with protective concrete corridors running from the reservoir to the pumping stations at the hydroelectric complex.

Protected by Penetron: The Iremel Reservoir project included a water pipeline (538 m) with protective concrete corridors running from the reservoir to the pumping stations at the hydroelectric complex.


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